Skip to Content

Site Settings

The settings for a site can be accessed by navigating to Setup > Sites and either clicking the name of the site (not the URL) or hovering over the site and selecting Edit > Site. These options are the same whether creating a new site or editing an existing one.

Site Information

  • Site Name*: The name of your site (technically, also the name of the folder containing all site files on the staging server). This can't be changed once created and should be unique to the account. Can include uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, hyphens, and underscores (but no spaces).
  • UUID: Used with the LDP module. This is automatically generated after site creation and cannot be edited.
  • Public Key: Displays the site's SSH public key. This key can be used to create a secure connection from OU Campus to the production server without needing a username and password. In order for the public key authorization to function properly, the OU Campus public key needs to be copied to the .ssh/authorized_keys file on your production server. This is automatically generated after site creation and cannot be edited.
    Ubuntu documentation on public keys.
    The "Generate" button regenerates the public key for a site. If the server has already been configured to authenticate with a public key, regenerating a new key breaks that connection and it needs to be reconfigured. Additionally, if a site has been registered with an SSM for LDP, it needs to be re-registered with the name, UUID, and public key of the site.
  • Global Search Indexing: The "Build Index" button creates an index of the entire site that is used for global search.
    Once an initial index has been built, it is updated automatically when changes are made, even if global search is turned off. The only exception is when content is loaded via an FTP upload, which requires rebuilding the index. Folders and pages can be excluded from indexing via access settings, and only saved content is indexed. When a file is deleted or recycled, it's automatically removed from the index.
    *Required

Production Server FTP Settings

These are configured during your implementation of OU Campus, and should not need to be modified unless your production server changes.

  • Server*: The FTP address, IP address, or domain name of the website.
  • FTP Type*: FTP, or File Transfer Protocol, is how OU Campus connects to your live website in order to publish pages. The available FTP types are:
    • SFTP: Secure FTP; choosing this enables the "Authentication Type" and "UMask" fields
    • FTP: Active mode, only available for self-hosted implementations
    • Passive FTP: PASV mode for FTP
  • Username*: The username for the FTP account.
  • Authentication Type: If the FTP type is SFTP, choose between using a password or the public key generated in site information to authenticate the FTP connection. Which you choose depends on how the production server is configured.
  • Password*: The password for the FTP account, should a password be used for authentication. An account setting can reveal the password.
    The "Test Connection" button tests that the required credentials are correct.
  • UMask: Available for SFTP. UMask settings set the UNIX-based file permissions for files within the site.
    • User writable: Default; all file permissions are set to 644.
    • User + group writable: All file permissions are set to 664.
    Changing this setting only affects new files going forward; a site republish changes the file settings on the server. The users and groups referred to apply to the UNIX files system, not users and groups in OU Campus.
    Umask on Wikipedia.
  • FTP Root*: Determines the root of what is accessible in OU Campus when viewing production. Requires a preceding slash, and can be left as a / to indicate the root. However, the root of the FTP server account doesn't always have the correct permissions to be the FTP or website root. For example, if the permissions are configured to allow the FTP user only read/execute FTP access to the account root while the directory with the appropriate web server permissions is /public_html (user: read/write/execute), then the FTP Root should be /public_html. If left as root / then OU Campus can't upload to /.
    If setting up multiple sites within OU Campus that share a server, FTP root can be used to delineate them. For example, if the Art Department requires a separate site then the FTP Root can be set as /public_html/art/ and the HTTP Root is set correspondingly as http://domain.edu/art/.
  • FTP Home: Must be a subfolder of the FTP root. It is the highest folder to which files can be affected on production. For example, if the FTP home is defined as /public_html/art, then any files published from the site must be in domain.edu/art or lower. This was originally designed as a way to share images and other resources across sites, but with features such as binary management, its functionality has been decreased.
  • HTTP Root*: The HTTP URL of your website, as corresponds to the FTP root. Must include both http:// and the trailing /. If this changes, the entire site must be republished.
  • Image Directory: Choose a default location for users to be placed when choosing an image to insert. Must be a subfolder of the FTP root, e.g. /public_html/images.
  • Template Location: Template files can be housed either on the staging or production server.
  • Template Directory: Define a path to the folder in your site, either staging or production, where the template files are stored. When identifying a remote path, include the FTP root.
  • Available To: Choose which group has access to the production server. Users who don't have access are unable to publish pages or perform other OU Campus actions that affect the production server.
    *Required

DirectEdit Button

The DirectEdit button is the button or link on each page of the website that users click to log in to OU Campus.

  • Button Type: Choose a button type.
    • None: Disables DirectEdit
    • Standard: Uses the OU icon for the DirectEdit link, and can be used in conjunction with the "Button Code" field for custom styling
    • Transparent: Adds a predefined transparent GIF as the DirectEdit link
  • Button Code: Enter custom code to style the link here. <a href="^0" target="_top" rel="nofollow">Last Updated ^2</a> displays as the typical "Last Updated" link. The CSS and styling of your pages affects this link as well.

Site Preferences

  • Recycle Bin: Choose a folder for the recycle bin to occupy. It must be at the root of the site and begin with a forward slash /. Once set up, the recycle bin isn't visible as a folder in the file structure.
  • Time Zone: Set a time zone for system dates and times by picking a city or region that most closely matches your site's location. For SaaS clients, the default is "America/Los Angeles." If left blank, the site uses the time zone set in account settings.
  • Locale: Set a locale for the site. The locale chooses a default dictionary for spelling checks and formats date/time stamps. The default is "English (United States)." If left blank, the site uses the locale set in account settings.
  • Local Assets Group: Restrict a group to only using assets that were created in this site, as opposed to using all assets in the account.

Publish Settings

  • Final Check: Select this to automatically run final check whenever a page or file is published.
  • Final Check Options: Choose which of the four checks (spell, link, W3C, and accessibility) are included when final check runs, if final check is enforced.
  • Enable Publish Button: If final check is enforced, you can restrict publishing so that it is only an option when the enforced check(s) pass.
  • Default Tweet/Wall Post: Enter default text to be inserted into the social media field when publishing a page. This overrides the default text set at the account level.
  • Remove OU Tags: Select this for all forms of the OU Campus tags (<!-- com.omniupdate.div>, <!-- ouc:div-->, <ouc:div>) to be removed from the source code of pages on publish. This includes the tags used to identify editable regions.

WYSIWYG Editor

  • Use HTML5 Schema: HTML5 was introduced in 2014, with new elements and standards. If your website designs use HTML5, check this box so that those elements aren't stripped out by the WYSIWYG Editor.
  • URL Type: Defines the format of links and image URLs.
    • Absolute: Renders a complete URL (https://college.edu/about/history.html)
    • Root-Relative: Renders the URL after the / of the site root (/about/history.html)
    • Page-Relative: Renders the URL from after the / of the page on which the link or image is inserted (/history.html). Not available if dependency manager is being used.
  • Decorative Images: Allows either administrators or all users to insert images without having to include a description. Keep in mind that enabling this may affect the site's Section 508 accessibility compliance.
  • Disable Image Resizing: Disables changing image dimensions when inserting an image. This doesn't affect the image editor.
  • Disable Image Alignment Menu: Disables changing the alignment of images when inserting them on a page.
  • Toolbar: Set a default custom toolbar for the WYSIWYG Editor. This overrides a toolbar set in account settings, but can be in turn overridden by toolbars set in folder or page access settings.

File Naming

This panel controls the naming convention of new files and when uploading nonbinary files, using regex. A commonly-used regex for file naming is [a-z0-9\-_.]*. This allows for lowercase letters, numerals 0-9, hyphens, underscores, and periods. The file system is case-insensitive, meaning that filename.pcf and FILENAME.pcf are considered the same. Certain characters are also automatically excluded from OU Campus and can't be used for any filename, regardless of custom regex: !#$%^&*()[]?'"|<>{};:,+=. The maximum filename length is 128 characters.

  • Default Extension: The value used if a TCF (template control file) doesn't specify an extension. Does not need to include a period.
  • File Name Regex: Enter a regex to limit the names of files.
  • Filename Must NOT Match Regex: Select this so the above regex specifies what characters are disallowed, rather than allowed.
  • Regex Description: Write a description to be displayed along with the standard error message when a user enters a disallowed file name.
  • Test Regex: If a file name regex is entered, type into this field to test whether a name is allowed or not.
  • Allow Uppercase Folder Names: Check to allow uppercase letters in folder names.

Binary File Naming

This panel controls the naming convention of binary files (images, PDFs, etc.). using regex. A commonly-used regex for file naming is [a-z0-9\-_.]*. This allows for lowercase letters, numerals 0-9, hyphens, underscores, and periods. The file system is case-insensitive, meaning that filename.jpg and FILENAME.jpg are considered the same. Certain characters are also automatically excluded from OU Campus and can't be used for any filename, regardless of custom regex:!#$%^&*()[]?'"|<>{};:,+=. The maximum filename length is 128 characters.

  • Binary File Name Regex: Enter a regex to limit the names of files.
  • Binary File Name Must NOT Match: Select this so the above regex what characters are disallowed, rather than allowed.
  • Binary Regex Description: Write a description to be displayed along with the standard error message when a user enters a disallowed file name.
  • Test Regex: If a file name regex is entered, type into this field to test whether a name is allowed or not.

Upload Limits

Set the maximum size for each type of file in either kilobytes (KB) or megabytes (MB). Leave blank for no limit. Users levels 9 and 10 aren't restricted by upload limits.

LDP Settings

These settings are used for configuring your Live Delivery Platform module; see the module documentation for more information.

Auxiliary Sites

Auxiliary sites at the site level function the same way they do at the account level. Because all an auxiliary site really is is an FTP connection to a preexisting location, the options for setting up an auxiliary site are the same as those in the Production Server FTP Settings.

Publish targets give the option to publish to a different production server than the main one. This can be useful for testing designs, server-side code, or other changes on a development server, or for showing pages to non-OU Campus users for review before publishing them to the live website. The target server can be restricted so it's only accessible from a campus network, from behind a firewall, or for certain IP addresses.

Creating a new publish target also has the same options as Production Server FTP Settings, with the addition of "Publish Default." Select this to make the publish target the default choice when publishing files. In addition to defining site settings, supporting files needed for a publish target (including files from the _resources folder such as CSS, server-side scripts, background images, any other binary files) should be cloned to each publish target.

XSL, TMPL, and TCF files do not need to be published to each server if they reside on the staging server. To determine if the XSL, TMPL, and TCF files need to be cloned to each production target, navigate to the Production Server FTP Settings panel and look at the setting for template location. If the setting is set to "Local (staging server)," there is no need to copy the template files and XSL to each production target.

  • Publish Target Best Practices
    • The default publish target can be configured for the development stage of a new site. When going live to the main production server, the default can be switched back by clearing the checkbox in site settings.
    • If using a publish target during development, make it the default and set the production server's Available To to "None." Use extreme caution when publishing as an administrator.
    • Always compare and preview before publishing to a server.
    • Use zip import to move a large number of files from the development server to the production server.
    • Use root-relative URLs.
    • When defining the name for publish targets, using descriptive names helps the users know which server to select. Auxiliary sites and publish targets are both shown in the drop-down list, and it is sorted alphabetically by default. It may be prudent to develop a naming convention to distinguish among server types.
    • Define user groups to restrict access to specific publish targets and help avoid user confusion and inadvertent publishes to incorrect servers.
    • Publish targets should not be used for clustering or load-balancing. If you publish to a production server, and the page gets automatically cloned or copied onto multiple servers for load-balancing for visitor traffic, that practice should continue and not be replaced by multi-target publish.
    • Make sure dependency manager is enabled. When using absolute URLs, dependency manager must be turned on for the final publish to work with the server. If dependency manager is not enabled, paths are hard-coded with the chosen server. For example, if during the development stage a dev.gallena.edu target is created, paths are hard-coded to that development server path. When switching over publishing to the gallena.edu production server, the hard-coded paths would be incorrect.

Optional Features

Dependency manager and binary management must first be enabled at the account level to be available for the site.